Guitar Giveaway – Justification Jam

A huge thanks to all of our participants. Let's congratulate Victor Esparza , who joined our jam and won this beautiful Seagull Artist Mosaic acoustic guitar and case valued at $1229!

win a guitar
The Seagull Artist Mosaic

Victor Wins

Victor with victory in his hands. Thanks again to all who joined the jam and please stay tuned for the next promotion and prize!

Justification Jam summary - how it worked:

Talent used to be enough to make your mark in music. Today we need to be a Jack and Jill of all trades and master of most; software, hardware,  marketing, event planning... to name only a few. And it doesn't end there. Not only do we need to know just about every trick in the book, we need to be able to explain the many respectable skills necessary to succeed at a profession that is not as easy as it looks.

Collectively, we built a lasting list of skills required to be a successful guitar player in today's music scene. We created an important list that is now a resource to assist guitar players everywhere. By taking the following 3 actions, Victor won a highly rated Seagull Artist Mosaic guitar in our guitar giveaway:

  1. Liked Robbie's FaceBook page
  2. Listened to Robbie's list of skills in his Justification Jam video
  3. Sent us a skill that Robbie hadn't mentioned in his video (using the reply form at the bottom of this page).

Robbie's Justification Jam

The blues, standards and 3 chord rock & roll are great vehicles for playing at sessions. But the Justification Jam may be the most universal song that musicians are asked to play. Whether it's a social event, a house party, a formal introduction or an interview, you're inevitably going to get the request, "What do you do?"

People can have trouble "getting" guitar players

While it is sometimes easier to just adlib a response like, "I'm a big-game hunter", or "I'm an astronaut, how about you?", these clever quips may not soften your inquisition. Of course telling the truth often results in creating subtle sympathy, jealousy  or confusion. So, as with every gig you've ever played, the key is in knowing the material.

Enter the Justification Jam. The Justification Jam is an invaluable tool created by Robbie Burns, a veteran guitar player and expert at blending art and commerce. It helps gently lead your inquisitor through the myriad of skills and talents required to be a working musician. The Justification Jam ultimately eases your audience into the conclusion that music is an honorable profession and a worthwhile endeavor.

A long laundry list of necessary abilities

The Justification Jam is a way to create respect for your efforts and for the profession. At the core, it's an inventory of abilities you need to succeed in the music business. And when you finish delivering this long laundry list - clean, impressed, no starch - you'll have washed away the misconceptions and have the people eating out of your hand.

An appreciation for all the thoughtful comments

With all of your contributions of additional skills and abilities you thought contemporary musicians needed, we accomplished something meaningful. And we can keep the list growing so we will always have an evolving tool to help us both professionally and socially.

Now that you know about the Justification Jam, the next time you're put on the spot, you'll be ready to stand, deliver and make everyone feel great, especially you!  Keep your eyes open for the next contest...

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42 thoughts on “Guitar Giveaway – Justification Jam”

  1. Being a musician, these days is not easy. So many people are quick to judge a song within the first 5-10 seconds of listening. If your music doesn’t grab their attention within this timeframe, chances are you’ve already lost the battle.

    Musicians must create something that is original, but also something beautiful and unique. Most of what music is, is story telling passed on through different generations and genres. Creating something original, and real that listeners can relate to can be a very difficult, but one of the most important aspects of your music.

  2. You have to have the ability to think on your feet while performing. You must be able to respond quickly to changing circumstances like audience moods, etc.

  3. Hi Robbie – great video! One thing I would add is the ability to connect with the music you’re singing / playing, and your audience. I think it can be easy to rehearse so much that you forget to enjoy what you’re doing and really feel it. That’s the whole point after all!

  4. Robbie, the list is growing. I find I need focus, endurance and vision. A ‘Vision’ of where I am going and why is needed. Its not enough to say “I love music”…..no, something meaningful, like world peace or something. ‘Endurance’ helps me to go on in the face huge obstacles (world peace is a big job) and ‘focus’ to get the job done. Still working on that part. Loved your video. Cheers.

  5. A guitar player needs unbreakable FOCUS. You’ve gotta be able to work through distractions like loud unexpected sounds, bad smells (ie: band member off gassing), an attractive admirer in the front row, bodily pain, the urge to accept too many free drinks, the mind’s tendency to stress about bills, debt and your last argument with your spouse, projectiles, drunken streakers, and……oh, look, a squirrel

  6. the one skill they all need, is learn to listen more. you can’t put out to your audience, or your fellow musicians, unless you have developed good listening skills first. bottom line “to give a good answer,you must be fully able to hear the question. “

  7. Truly being an artist in every sense of the word from your own personal sense of style to being able to incorporate that with your hopefully like minded band mates.

  8. There is all the live sound / PA stuff, dealing with the sound person , promotion, and getting paid by the promotor. Dealing with other artists at events, how to rehearse, how to quickly learn new material, and know when to turn down or sit out.

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